Introduction to Broken Grace

At the intersection of Theology & Culture

Leonard Cohen, who died this year on November 7th at the age of 82, once wrote to his publisher that he wished with his poetry and music to reach “inner-directed adolescents, lovers in all degrees of anguish, disappointed Platonists, pornography-peepers, hair-handed monks and popists.” Cohen saw divine grace as broken, yet he searched for a restoration of grace not broken.

Broken Grace is found at the intersection of Grace and Culture. The intersection is full of pot-holes and cracked surfaces, gutters littered with garbage. Broken.

It is at the intersection of Grace & Culture at he find Cohen’s “inner-directed adolescents, lovers in all degrees of anguish, disappointed Platonists, pornography-peepers, hair-handed monks and popists.”

It is also at the intersection of Grace & Culture where we find a broken church—hopefully to show grace … but more often than not, the church is simply broken.